Despite Sweetheart Deal, Scott Pruitt Was Reportedly a Nightmare Tenant Who Never Took Out the Trash

Despite Sweetheart Deal, Scott Pruitt Was Reportedly a Nightmare Tenant Who Never Took Out the Trash

- in NEWS
10
0
Fliers posted around Capitol Hill poke fun at EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt on April 6, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Fliers posted around Capitol Hill poke fun at EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt on April 6, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

During the early months of the Trump administration, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, famously, rented a room in a townhouse for $50 a night from D.C. power lobbyist J. Steven Hart and his wife Vicki Hart. All involved maintain this does not amount to a sweetheart deal for the ethically challenged Pruitt, but what is becoming more clear is that Pruitt was a bit of a nightmare as a tenant.

Exhibit A: Pruitt didn’t take out the trash, until explicitly instructed how to store and then dispose of rubbish. From the Daily Beast:

Pruitt was described by numerous sources as a disastrous tenant, with one comparing him to Owen Wilson’s character in You, Me and Dupree. According to three people familiar with events, Pruitt would not take out the trash during his time staying at the townhouse believing that a cleaning service would do it for him. There was no cleaning service that came with the apartment, however. And the garbage bags piled up to the point that Vicki Hart was forced to tell him to put them in the canister and to take that canister out to the street the next time he left the building.

Exhibit B: He wouldn’t leave. Via Politico:

The couple, Vicki and Steve Hart, became so frustrated by their lingering tenant that they eventually pushed him out and changed their locks. After trying to nudge Pruitt out of their home over the course of several months, the Harts finally told Pruitt in July that they had plans to rent his room to another tenant.

Scott Pruitt’s guest rating: one-star.

You depend on Slate for sharp, distinctive coverage of the latest developments in politics and culture. Now we need to ask for your support.

Our work is more urgent than ever and is reaching more readers—but online advertising revenues don’t fully cover our costs, and we don’t have print subscribers to help keep us afloat. So we need your help. If you think Slate’s work matters, become a Slate Plus member. You’ll get exclusive members-only content and a suite of great benefits—and you’ll help secure Slate’s future.

Join Slate Plus

About the author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *